Pastoral Period (Sahara and Horn of Africa)

This period of art is thought to have lasted between 3,000 and 4,000 years. It seems to have declined after 4,000 BP but continued in some areas into the Horse Period. Dramatic climatic changes took place during these millennia and the art of the period reflects a changing attitude towards nature and property. Man also becomes much more important and human figures now play a central role in the art. From this time onwards man no longer appears as part of nature, closely allied to other animals, but is portrayed as being above nature, yet able to derive sustenance from it. Paintings and engravings still depict wild animals but cattle and stock now predominate. The Pastoral Period commences as society begins to become organised on a stratified hierarchical basis while its latter centuries coincide with Egypt’s earlier Pharaonic Dynasties. The Pyramids, for example, were introduced in the 4th Dynasty, or about 4,500 BP at Giza.

The Pastoral Period commences as society begins to become organised on a stratified hierarchical basis while its latter centuries coincide with Egypt’s earlier Pharaonic Dynasties. The Pyramids, for example, were introduced in the 4th Dynasty, or about 4,500 BP at Giza.

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